September 7, 2014

mythologyofblue:

Alexander von Humboldt, Geological charts illustrating the formation of mountains, c. 1805. (via magictransistor)

September 2, 2014

via innerbohemienne:

The Codex Gigas

The Codex Gigas (or ‘Giant Book”) is also known as “The Devil’s Bible.” A curious illustration of Lucifer gives the tome its nickname.

The 13th-century manuscript is thought to have been created solely by a Herman the Recluse, a monk of the Benedictine monastery of Podlažice near Chrudim in Czech Republic. The calligraphy style is amazingly uniform throughout, believed to have taken 25 to 30 years  of work. There are no notable mistakes or omissions.  Pigment analysis revealed the ink to be consistent throughout. The book is enormous - it  measures 36.2” tall, 19.3” wide, and 8.6” thick; it weighs approximately 165 pounds. There are 310 vellum  leaves (620 pages).  The leaves are bound in a wooden folder covered with leather and ornate metal.

The manuscript is elaborately illuminated in red, blue, yellow, green and gold.  The entire document is written in Latin, and also contains Hebrew, Greek, and Slavic Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. The first part of the text includes the Vulgate version of the Bible.  Between the Old and New Testaments are Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews and De bello iudaico, as well as Isidore of Seville's encyclopedia Etymologiae and medical works of Hippocrates, Theophilus, Philaretus, and Constantinus.  Following a blank page, the New Testament commences.

Beginning the second part is a depiction of the devil.  Directly opposite is a full picture of the kingdom of heaven, juxtaposing the “good versus evil.”  The second half, following the picture of the devil, is Cosmas of Prague's Chronicle of Bohemia.  A list of brothers in the Podlažice monastery and a calendar with necrologium, magic formulae and other local records round out the codex.  Record entries end in the year 1229CE.

In 1648 at the end of the Thirty Years’ War, the Swedish army invaded Prague and the Codex was stolen as plunder.  It is now held at the National Library of Sweden in Stockholm.  For more information, check out this short National Geographic documentary and/or flip through this digital copy.

( Wikipedia entry, et. al)

Several short National Geographic videos ~

One Helluva Book

Who Wrote The Devil’s Bible?

Super-human Scribe

The Devil’s Bible - Part 1.flv  (9:59) (derived from full video bleow)

The Devil’s Bible - Part 2.flv  (9:59) (derived from full video below)

** If you have the least amount of intellectual curiosity or interest in history, the short vids above will only whet your appetite: might as well grab a cold drink & some popcorn, then settle in to watch the whole thing ~

NatGeo : The Devil’s Bible - Full video  (44:58)

(Source: bhilluminated.wordpress.com, via awesomearchives)

September 1, 2014
mythologyofblue:

Japanese star map + +

mythologyofblue:

Japanese star map + +

August 24, 2014

(Source: pwplsteens, via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

August 20, 2014

neilcicierega:

klaus-laserdisc:

1980s Workplace Computer Precautions

Loose MIPS Sink Chips

(Source: reddit.com, via continuants)

August 16, 2014

(via raptorteeth)

August 4, 2014

18th century poesy ring.Inscription reads: Many are the stars I see but in my eye no star like thee.

18th century poesy ring.
Inscription reads: Many are the stars I see but in my eye no star like thee.

(Source: yseult, via vintagegal)

July 30, 2014
explore-blog:

Vincent van Gogh’s never-before-seen sketchbooks - a bittersweet record of artistic genius and unlived dreams

explore-blog:

Vincent van Gogh’s never-before-seen sketchbooks - a bittersweet record of artistic genius and unlived dreams

(Source: , via tiger-milk)

July 14, 2014
theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

June 19, 2014

theplanetofsound:

Soviet-Era Bootleg Recordings of Banned Western Music Pressed on Discarded X-Ray Plates 

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.” 

via Junk Culture

via