July 30, 2014
explore-blog:

Vincent van Gogh’s never-before-seen sketchbooks - a bittersweet record of artistic genius and unlived dreams

explore-blog:

Vincent van Gogh’s never-before-seen sketchbooks - a bittersweet record of artistic genius and unlived dreams

(Source: , via tiger-milk)

July 14, 2014
theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

When Charlotte Brontë was thirteen and her brother, Branwell, was twelve, they designed and wrote a series of tiny books: “Measuring less than one inch by two inches, the books were made from scraps of paper and constructed by hand. Despite their diminutive size, the books contained big adventures, written in ink in careful script.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

June 19, 2014

theplanetofsound:

Soviet-Era Bootleg Recordings of Banned Western Music Pressed on Discarded X-Ray Plates 

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.” 

via Junk Culture

via

June 16, 2014
exfidefiducia:

aaawhyme:

tobejuliaagain:

aetheling:


 “Pooh and his friends were given as gifts by author A. A. Milne to his son Christopher Robin Milne between 1920 and 1922. Pooh was purchased in London at Harrods for Christopher’s first birthday. Christopher later gave them to publisher E. P. Dutton, who in turn donated them to the New York Public Library.”


Oh my god. Oh my god.

This is them, guys. This is them. Got chills.

*surge of childhood memories and emotions*

exfidefiducia:

aaawhyme:

tobejuliaagain:

aetheling:

“Pooh and his friends were given as gifts by author A. A. Milne to his son Christopher Robin Milne between 1920 and 1922. Pooh was purchased in London at Harrods for Christopher’s first birthday. Christopher later gave them to publisher E. P. Dutton, who in turn donated them to the New York Public Library.”

Oh my god. Oh my god.

This is them, guys. This is them. Got chills.

*surge of childhood memories and emotions*

(via memewhore)

December 14, 2013
updownbindery:

design-is-fine:

Recipe book for decorated paper, late 19th century. Germany. Koninklijke Bibliothek

So cool!

updownbindery:

design-is-fine:

Recipe book for decorated paper, late 19th century. Germany. Koninklijke Bibliothek

So cool!

(via libralthinking)

December 9, 2013
explore-blog:

Lovely vintage ads for libraries and reading from the 1950s-1980s.

explore-blog:

Lovely vintage ads for libraries and reading from the 1950s-1980s.

(Source: , via dansscans)

October 31, 2013

odditiesoflife:

Vintage Bookplates Featuring the Grim Reaper

On each bookplate, you will notice the words Ex Libris. A bookplate, also known as ex-librīs [Latin, “from the books of…”], is usually a small print or decorative label pasted into a book, often on the inside front cover, to indicate its owner.

Bookplates typically bear a name, motto, device, coat-of-arms, crest, badge, or any motif that relates to the owner of the book, or is requested by him from the artist or designer. The name of the owner usually follows an inscription such as “from the books of…” or “from the library of…”, or in Latin, ex libris….

Bookplates are important evidence for the provenance of books. In the United States, bookplates replaced book rhymes after the 19th century. The earliest known marks of ownership of books or documents date from the reign of Amenophis III in Egypt (1391–1353 BC).

However, in their modern form, they evolved from simple inscriptions in books which were common in Europe in the Middle Ages, when various other forms of “librarianship” became widespread (such as the use of class-marks, call-numbers, or shelfmarks). The earliest known examples of printed bookplates are German, and date from the 15th century.

sources 1, 2, 3

(via zachselley)

September 11, 2013
mythologyofblue:

Shakespeare’s handwriting - and why it matters. Read this NYT article. (via erikkwakkel) +

mythologyofblue:

Shakespeare’s handwriting - and why it matters. Read this NYT article. (via erikkwakkel) +

August 29, 2013

lilith-et-adalia:

Marie Antoinette’s Last Letter Stained By Her Tears

16th October, 4.30 A.M.

It is to you, my sister, that I write for the last time. I have just been condemned, not to a shameful death, for such is only for criminals, but to go and rejoin your brother. Innocent like him, I hope to show the same firmness in my last moments. I am calm, as one is when one’s conscience reproaches one with nothing. I feel profound sorrow in leaving my poor children: you know that I only lived for them and for you, my good and tender sister.

Read More

(Source: teaattrianon.forumotion.com, via tiger-milk)

August 19, 2013
uispeccoll:

digg:

The first known globe to include the New World is engraved on an ostrich egg

WOW! SERIOUSLY!?! WHAT? AMAZING!

uispeccoll:

digg:

The first known globe to include the New World is engraved on an ostrich egg

WOW! SERIOUSLY!?! WHAT? AMAZING!